Red Eye SOO

September 15, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

Dear Residents,

YOU WANTED SOO PREP? Well, here it is!

The CPFC oral exam has five simulated office orals (SOOs). Each of the stations is 15 minutes long. The CFPC is attempting to mimic the actual Family Practice setting.
The scoring system focuses on the candidate’s approach to dealing with the illness experience and interactions with the patient. Getting the correct diagnosis plays only a minor role in the scoring.
When using the FMEP SOO practice, we recommend practicing with a study buddy. Practice, practice, practice! Don’t be discouraged if you miss some points… it’s part of the studying process. The FMEP course will go over many, many practice SOOs with you to get you prepared.
Click here for some helpful information from the CFPC website on SOOs.

Good luck!

We look forward to seeing many of you soon 🙂

FMEP Course Team

 

SOO

Sara Mcgill is a 43 year old law clerk who is presenting with a two day history of eye redness and discomfort. She has a history of Diabetes, Hypertension and Rheumatoid arthritis. Her medications include Losartan, Metformin and Methotrexate. She smokes half a pack per day and drinks 3-4 beers on the weekends only. She is single and has a 4 year old daughter who is enrolled in daycare.
You are asked to speak to Sara.

Red Eye Illness Experience
Areas to be covered include:

  1. Eye symptoms
    • Onset and duration of symptoms
    • Unilateral or bilateral eye involvement
    • Whether it has been stable or progressively worsening, and whether it is present constantly or intermittently
    • Ocular pain
    • Foreign-body sensation
    • Photophobia
    • Presence of discharge
  2. Associated symptoms
    • Rhinorrhea
    • Sore throat
    • Fever
    • Headache
  3. Past medical history
    • Ocular disorders
    • Systemic disorders
    • Sexually transmitted infections
    • Clotting disorders
    • Vascular disorders
    • Allergies
  4. Exposures
    • Environmental
    • Close contacts with similar symptoms
    • Trauma
    • Contact lens use
Feelings

  • Worried that this is contagious and she may spread it to others.

Ideas

  • The physician will help her treat the eye infection.

Effect/Impact on Function

  • She is embarrassed to go to work and see friends until her eye heals.

Expectations for this visit

  • The physician will give her an antibiotic for her eye

A satisfactory understanding of all components (Feelings, Ideas, Effect/Impact on Function, and Expectations) is important in assessing the illness experience of this patient.

 

Superior Certificant Covers points 1, 2, 3, and 4. Actively explores the illness experience to arrive at an in-depth understanding of it. This is achieved through the purposeful use of verbal and non-verbal techniques, including both effective questioning and active listening.
Certificant Covers points 1, 2, and 3. Inquires about the illness experience to arrive at a satisfactory understanding of it. This is achieved by asking appropriate questions and using non-verbal skills.
Non-certificant Does not cover points 1, 2, and 3. Demonstrates only minimal interest in the illness experience, and so gains little understanding of it. There is little acknowledgement of the patient’s verbal or non-verbal cues, or the candidate cuts the patient off.
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“Don’t Make a RASH Mistake on Your CCFP Exam!” – Your Pruritis SAMP

August 20, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

We are excited to see so many of you join our fall FMEP courses. Several of you have requested we continue to post more practice SAMPs, so here you go!

Just a reminder… pay attention to the questions. Here are our general tips one more time:

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Doctor, My Face Won’t Move! What’s Going On?

July 29, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

We are excited to see so many of you join our fall FMEP courses. Several of you have requested we continue to post more practice SAMPs, so here you go!

Just a reminder… pay attention to the questions. Here are our general tips one more time:

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YOUR DETAILED CCFP EXAM STUDY CALENDAR: BE PREPARED!

July 23, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

The CCFP exam is quickly approaching. We know you are juggling many personal and professional responsibilities. The FMEP Course is here to help!

We have made a study calendar to help keep you on track.

Click here to see the calendar.

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Antenatal SAMP on Iron Deficiency Anemia

July 15, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

We are excited to see so many of you join our fall FMEP courses. Several of you have requested we continue to post more practice SAMPs, so here you go!

Just a reminder… pay attention to the questions. Here are our general tips one more time:

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Doctor, Do I Have Monkeypox?!

July 2, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

We are excited to see so many of you join our fall FMEP courses. Several of you have requested we continue to post more practice SAMPs, so here you go!

Just a reminder… pay attention to the questions. Here are our general tips one more time:

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YOUR DETAILED CCFP EXAM STUDY CALENDAR: BE PREPARED!

February 21, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

The CCFP exam is quickly approaching. We know you are juggling many personal and professional responsibilities. The FMEP Course is here to help!

We have made a study calendar to help keep you on track.

Click here to see the calendar.

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CCFP SOO Exam DOs and DON’Ts! The FMEP Course will get you ready!

February 10, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

As many of you know, the CCFP examination is being delivered in a virtual format.
Most things will not change except for you interacting with the examiner through a digital platform called Practique.

We know that writing the CCFP examination is stressful enough as it is, so our team at the Family Medicine Exam Prep Course has compiled important information about the SOO component of the exam… to make things a bit easier!

Here is the important SOO exam information:

1. What should I review before the SOO component of the exam?

2. Where do I write the exam?

    • You can complete the SOO exam from any place you want – we strongly recommend finding a quiet place that is familiar and comfortable to you. Practice SOOs with a colleague via a Zoom or Skype session to give yourself a chance to become familiar with what it is like to interview someone through a computer rather than in person. DO NOT carry out your SOO in a major public place or at a university as you may run the risk of having a compromised internet connection during your SOO.

3. How long is the exam?

    • The exam runs for 2.5 hours (this does not include the additional 15 minutes you will be given to get set up).

4. Do I need to have any specific items with me for the exam?

    • You will be required to provide visual evidence of your identity with a government-issued ID (with a picture). You can use a passport or a current driver’s license. You do not require a pen or paper. You can take notes using the examination platform. You can also have a drink (such as water), as long as it is visible to the examiner and it is in a clear container (remember the bubbly comes AFTER you are done with your CCFP exam!!!).

5. What should you NOT do during the exam?

    • Do not move away from the camera during the exam
    • Warn everyone around you not to enter the room during the exam
    • Put away all books and notes during the exam
    • Do not give or get assistance during the exam
    • Do not write down the exam questions
    • Do not have any paper or pens around you (all note-taking will be done on the computer)

6. What kind of computer do I need?

    • You must have a laptop or desktop computer that has a built-in webcam, speakers, and microphone.
    • You must have a reliable internet connection.
    • Multiple screens are not allowed.

7. How do I answer the SOO questions?

    • SOO questions can be challenging, but we are confident that you will be well prepared to tackle any station you get.
    • First, we recommend you review the sample SOO on our website (we have demonstrated an example of what a superior certificant SOO may look like… and one that is… well, terrible). You can access both here:
    • Secondly, review the CCFP website. Here is a helpful link: CCFP SOO Exam FAQs
    • Third, don’t worry – during our FMEP course weekend, we will run through different SOO scenarios and provide clear examples of how to answer difficult questions such as competency assessments, goals of care conversations, and present examples of how to manage difficult clinical encounters (such as dealing with a victim of sexual abuse, domestic violence, etc.). We will go over possible scenarios you may encounter during your exam and provide guidance on how to approach these scenarios… as well as what you should try and avoid!
    • Lastly, practice, practice, practice with a partner! We hope you found this blog useful, and as always don’t hesitate to reach out with any questions you may have! Good luck studying!
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CCFP EXAM: PASS OR FAIL? TOP FIVE TIPS TO HELP YOU PASS!

February 2, 2022 |by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

We know most of you are in serious study mode at this point and are well on your way in preparing for the CCFP exam!!!

Our team has sent out a quick survey to our previous course attendees who have successfully passed the 2020 and 2021 CCFP exams – we compiled tips and tricks that helped them pass the exam. Read on to get their PASSING THE CCFP EXAM secrets!

Here are the top five tips:

1. Trust Yourself. You know a lot more than you think you do!

    • The CCFP exam is written by physicians who are well aware of what residents are expected to know by the end of their residency. Although they may throw a curveball at you here and there, the exam is not designed to fail qualified candidates… but rather ensure that you are on par with your peers in your general medical knowledge.

2. Scheduling: Be organized!

    • Most candidates reiterated that pacing yourself in studying is key. Most people start studying 4-5 months prior to the exam date; November/December for the Spring exam and July/August for the Fall exam. The final 6 weeks is when most residents say they really ramp up their studying and focus on areas that are particularly difficult (e.g., review guidelines, review treatment algorithms, etc.). Most residents study 1-2 hours per day in those final 6 weeks and 4-5 hours during weekends before the exam date. However, as we mentioned in point #1 – your preparation for the CCFP exam begins when you enter the residency program. It is key to ensure that you read up on cases during residency and in practice as this truly solidifies your medical knowledge.

3. Don’t forget about yourself. This is really, really important!

    • Let’s be real – all of us have pulled all-nighters, neglected our diet, and skipped regular exercise now and again for the sake of cramming a few more hours of studying for that big exam during undergrad, post-graduate school, and even medical school. However, it is clear that maintaining a regular sleep and exercise schedule as well as eating healthy, well-balanced meals improves performance. Be mindful and make sure you have a good work-life balance…

4. Come up with a plan of how you will tackle each CCFP topic! There are 105. Start planning…

    • The CCFP lays out its objectives for all candidates to review. Review them and decide each day which objectives you will tackle. Be strategic. One of the residents we interviewed said “I combined themes and topics together – for instance, one day I would study Anxiety and Depression key features, and another day I would combine Diabetes and Hypertension”. Review the more challenging topics like ACLS, Hyperlipidemia, and Hypertension the week before the exam to ensure it is fresh in your memory for exam day. Whether you use the Family Medicine Exam Prep Course to work with you to review each objective, or you study alone/with a study buddy, planning is key!

5. Resources, resources, resources!

    • There are several websites that are available to prepare for the CCFP exam. Here are a few that other residents have used BUT be careful! Although these are excellent resources to start off, unfortunately, some of them may be outdated (several of our successful candidates pointed this out). At the Family Medicine Exam Prep Course, we set several hours aside each day to review each topic and have a designated team that looks at the most recent guidelines to ensure you are getting the most up-to-date material for your exam.
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“Doc, I Need You to Check Me for Lung Cancer!”: Guidelines for Lung Cancer Screening

January 30, 2022 |by Written by Dr. Ammar Bookwala, Reviewed by Family Medicine Exam Prep Course | 0 Comments | CCFP | , , , , , , ,

We are excited to see so many of you join our spring FMEP courses. Several of you have requested we continue to post more practice SAMPs, so here you go!

Just a reminder… pay attention to the questions. Here are our general tips one more time:

(more…)

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